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July 30, 2008

Comments

Punktlich

That was brilliant. In 1970/71 I built a blue box out of 2 Heathkit tone generators back to back, with spring toggle switches to operate the MF tones. Worked well, but bulky. The next year I built a mini version, but right after that I got a job that needed a security clearance so I never used it. Then a couple of years after that I ran into a salesman for an IC manufacturer who pointed out to me that there was a commercial "blue box" equivalent circuit in the market that was regularly used in phone company circuitry in the mid-1970s. BTW somewhere I have issues of a phone phreakers' newsletter; when i get the chance I'll scan them and put them on the Web, assuming they're not already there. (I still have the original Esquire article, and somewhere I must have the Realist article as well, the one that explained how to make calls you receive free to the caller. It was put on protective reserve by the NYPL and I copied it by hand under the watchful eyes of a librarian.

Sfcircuits

Awesome idea for biz cards! I'm going to start pitching this to our clients ;)

Victor
http://www.sfcircuits.com

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